Hydroelectric Plants in Manitoba
Grand Rapids
Location: MB
Operator: Manitoba Hydro
Configuration: 4 X 118 MW Kaplan
Operation: 1965-1968
T/G supplier: EE, AC, CGE
EPC: Grand Rapids Constructors
Quick facts: By late 1950s, Manitoba Hydro had largely exhausted the hydro potential of the Winnipeg River and began this development on the Saskatchewan River. Construction started in Jan 1960 and the facility was completely in-service in Nov 1968. The C$117mn plant is connected to the grid via four 230kV lines and is the controlling plant on the provincial system as the four machines operate on load-frequency control. The variable pitch Kaplan turbines were the largest in North America at completion and operate at a design head of 36.6m. Photograph by Brian Simmons and courtesy of Manitoba Hydro
Posted 29 Jun 2003
Great Falls
Location: MB
Operator: Manitoba Hydro
Configuration: 6 X 22 MW propeller
Operation: 1923-1928
T/G supplier: DEW, SMS, CGE
Quick facts: Great Falls on the Winnipeg River is the oldest hydroelectric generating station owned by Manitoba Hydro. The station was developed by Winnipeg Electric Railway Co, a predecessor to Manitoba Hydro. Construction started in 1914 but was interrupted by World War I.  Construction restarted in 1919. Two rockfill earth dams, 338m and 317m, respectively, flank the powerhouse which houses some of the first large-scale propeller turbines ever built for these head conditions (over 10m).

Photograph courtesy of Manitoba Hydro
Posted 9 Jul 2006

Jenpeg
Location: MB
Operator: Manitoba Hydro
Configuration: 6 X 31 MW bulb
Operation: 1977-1979
T/G supplier: LMZ, Electrosila
EPC: Hydropower Institute, Jenpeg Constructors
Quick facts: Jenpeg is on the upper Nelson River 525km north of Winnipeg. Construction cost C$310mn and started in 1972. The plant was the first in North America to use bulb turbines. It is also one of the few fockfill dams of its type in the world and was built without a cofferdam. The powerhouse and spillway structures are used to control and regulate the outflow waters of Lake Winnipeg. In addition several other diversion channels were built along with new dam and weir structures required to maintain appropriate flow regimes.

Photograph by Brian Simmons and courtesy of Manitoba Hydro
Posted 29 Jun 2003

Kelsey
Location: MB
Operator: Manitoba Hydro
Configuration: 7 X 32 MW propeller
Operation: 1960-1972
T/G supplier: DEW, CGE
EPC: Dominion Structural Steel, Canadian Vickers
Quick facts: This was the first Manitoba Hydro plant on the Nelson River and was originally constructed to supply INCO mining and smelting operations in the Moak and Mystery Lake area and the City of Thompson. Six years after completion, Kelsey was linked to the provincial grid and new units were added to support INCO's expansion in the area and construction of Kettle Rapids. The plant is named after Hudson Bay Co employee Henry Kelsey who explored northern Manitoba in the late 1600s.

Photograph by Brian Simmons and courtesy of Manitoba Hydro
Posted 9 Jul 2006

Kettle Rapids
Location: MB
Operator: Manitoba Hydro
Configuration: 12 X 106 MW propeller
Operation: 1970-1974
T/G supplier: DEW, Toshiba
EPC: Kettle Constructors
Quick facts: Kettle is on the Nelson River 700km north of Winnipeg. The scheme consolidated a series of rapids into a run-of-river plant with a 30m head. The powerhouse is 380m long taking almost half of the 885m river width. The plant cost C$240mn. The site has a 138kV connection to the Radission Converter Station from which a + 450kV DC transmission line runs to Winnipeg.

Photograph by Brian Simmons and courtesy of Manitoba Hydro
Posted 1 Jul 2003

Long Spruce
Location: MB
Operator: Manitoba Hydro
Configuration: 10 X 98 MW propeller
Operation: 1977-1979
T/G supplier: DEW, CGE
EPC: Long Spruce Constructors, DEW
Quick facts: The C$508mn Long Spruce was the fourth power plant built on the Nelson River. The powerhouse, spillway, and earthfill dam measure 1,600m in length. The complex also includes 13km of dykes flanking the main dam. Since the site is in the discontinuous permafrost zone, special construction techniques were required for all the main structures. Half the plant output is is sent as alternating current to the Radisson Converter Station and half is sent to Henday Converter Station for conversion to direct current where it joins with power from Kettle and Limestone for transmission 895km to the Dorsey Converter Station at Rosser near Winnipeg.

Photograph by Brian Simmons and courtesy of Manitoba Hydro
Posted 1 Aug 2001

McArthur
Location: MB
Operator: Manitoba Hydro
Configuration: 8 X 7.65 MW propeller
Operation: 1954-1955
T/G supplier: DEW, CGE
EPC: Dominion Structural Steel, Canadian Vickers
Quick facts: This is both the smallest and newest generating plant on the Winnipeg River. Completion essentially completed the utilization of the river's hydroelectric generating potential. When built, McArthur was considered the largest plant in the world to be operating at such a low head (7m). The 800m earthfill dam was built on a natural island dividing the river into two channels. The plant cost C$24mn and is named after John Duncan McArthur, a leading regional industrialist from 1900-1925.

Photograph by Brian Simmons and courtesy of Manitoba Hydro
Posted 9 Jul 2006

Pine Falls
Location: MB
Operator: Manitoba Hydro
Configuration: 6 X 14 MW propeller
Operation: 1951-1952
T/G supplier: DEW, CGE
EPC: H G Acres & Co, The Foundation Co, Bird Construction Co
Quick facts: Construction at Pine Falls on the lower Winnipeg River began in the late 1940s during a period of rapidly increasing power demand in Manitoba. The C$23.5mn project was initiated by the Department of Mines and Natural resources. It is the last plant on the river before Lake Winnipeg and the first built after passage of the Manitoba Hydro-Electric Board Development Act in 1949. The plant's reinforced concrete dam is 610m long and reaches 18.3m in height. The powerhouse is 151 m long.

Photograph by Brian Simmons and courtesy of Manitoba Hydro
Posted 1 Jul 2003

Seven Sisters
Location: MB
Operator: Manitoba Hydro
Configuration: 6 X 25 MW propeller
Operation: 1931-1952
T/G supplier: DEW, AC, SMS, CGE
Quick facts: Seven Sisters is the largest hydroelectric plant on the Winnipeg River. Construction on the first phase began in Jul 1929 and was completed in Aug 1931. Three more sets were added from 1948-1952. The plant configuration required construction of 12.8km of dykes upstream of the plant wingwalls. The plant was manned 24hr a day until 1970 when new remote control equipment was added. After 50yrs of operation, a 6yr rehabilitation program was stared in 1979. This included extensive concrete repairs and new controls. Later, the turbines and generators were overhauled.

Photograph by Brian Simmons and courtesy of Manitoba Hydro
Posted 26 Mar 2001

Wuskwatim
Location: MB
Operator: Wuskwatim Power LP
Configuration: 3 X 66.7 MW propeller
Operation: 2012
T/G supplier: CGE
EPC: Acres, O'Connell-Neilson-EBC Partnership
Quick facts: This generating station is at Taskinigup Falls on the Burntwood River approximately 45km southwest of Thompson. Wuskwatim Power is a joint venture of the Nisichawayasihk Cree Nation and Manitoba Hydro and was the utility's launch equity partnership with a First Nations community on a generating station project. The plant plus 230kV transmission components cost about CND $1.6bn. The 120m long powerhouse operates at a head of about 22m. The first set went into operation on 2 Jul 2012.

Photograph courtesy of Manitoba Hydro
Posted 6 Mar 2010

Abbreviations

Data: industcards, Platts UDI World Electric Power Plants Data Base

Updated 15-Sep-2012

Home